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Fuck You Procrastination: Helping Women with ADHD Get Their Shit Together

Updated: Oct 3, 2023



If you're new here. Start with my previous post: ADHD Resources for Women: From A Therapist with ADHD.

Procrastination is a common challenge for many people, but it can be especially daunting for women with ADHD. The constant struggle to stay focused, manage time effectively, and combat distractions can make procrastination feel like an insurmountable obstacle. However, there are actionable tips and techniques tailored to the unique needs of women with ADHD that can help you tackle procrastination head-on and start tasks with confidence.




Understanding Procrastination in ADHD


Procrastination can manifest differently in individuals with ADHD due to challenges in executive functioning, time management, and impulse control. It's crucial to recognize that procrastination in ADHD is not a character flaw but rather a symptom of the condition. By understanding the roots of procrastination, you can develop targeted strategies to overcome it.


Practical Tips for Overcoming Procrastination


1. Harness the Power of Routine


Establishing a daily routine can provide structure and help you stay on track. Create a schedule that includes specific time blocks for tasks, breaks, and leisure activities. Consistency is key to building good habits.

2. Break Tasks into Smaller Steps


ADHD can make large tasks feel overwhelming. To make them more manageable, break them down into smaller, actionable steps. This not only reduces anxiety but also makes it easier to get started.

3. Use Visual Aids and Reminders


Visual cues and reminders can be invaluable for women with ADHD. Utilize sticky notes, color-coded calendars, smartphone apps or to-do lists to help you remember deadlines and tasks. Visual aids make it harder to ignore or forget important responsibilities and crossing off completed tasks helps experience a sense of accomplishment.

4. Prioritize with the Eisenhower Matrix


Use the Eisenhower Matrix to prioritize tasks based on their importance and urgency. Categorize tasks into four quadrants: urgent and important, important but not urgent, urgent but not important, and neither urgent nor important. Focus your energy on tasks in the "urgent and important" category to reduce procrastination.

5. Implement the Pomodoro Technique


The Pomodoro Technique can enhance your focus and productivity. Work for a focused 25 minutes (a Pomodoro), then take a 5-minute break. After four cycles, reward yourself with a more extended break. This method capitalizes on your ability to hyperfocus for short bursts enhancing productivity while preventing burnout.

6. Use the "Two-Minute Rule"


If a task can be completed in two minutes or less, do it immediately. This rule helps clear small tasks from your to-do list quickly, reducing the likelihood of procrastination.

7. Reduce Distractions


This seems super obvious, but it is often overlooked. Identify common distractions and take steps to minimize them. Create a designated workspace, turn off unnecessary notifications on your devices, and consider noise-canceling headphones if you're sensitive to sound distractions.

8. Body Doubling


Body doubling involves having someone else physically present while you work on a task or project. The presence of another person, often referred to as a "body double," can provide accountability, minimize resistance to start a task and provide structure making it easier to initiate and sustain focus on tasks.

9. Practice Mindfulness and Self-Compassion


Mindfulness meditation can help you stay present and focused. Take a few minutes to center yourself before beginning your work, and use mindfulness techniques to stay engaged in the task at hand. Practice self-compassion by acknowledging your challenges and treating yourself with kindness rather than self-criticism. Remember that ADHD doesn't define your worth or abilities.

10. Consider Medication and Professional Help


If your ADHD symptoms are significantly impacting your life, consult a healthcare professional. Medication and therapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or coaching, can be valuable tools in managing ADHD-related procrastination.

Additional Resources Here. From a Therapist with ADHD.


ADHD does not define your worth, it's an integral part of what makes you unique. As a therapist with ADHD, I understand the quirks, challenges, and incredible strengths that come with this neurodivergent territory.

Overcoming procrastination as a woman with ADHD may present unique challenges, but it's entirely possible with the right strategies and support. By harnessing the power of routine, breaking tasks into manageable steps, and employing techniques like the Pomodoro Technique, body doubling and the Eisenhower Matrix, you can tackle procrastination head-on and start tasks with confidence.

Remember that overcoming procrastination is a journey, and it may take time and practice to see significant improvements. Stay patient and persistent, and you'll find yourself making steady progress towards your goals. ADHD may present challenges, but it also brings unique strengths, creativity, and resilience that can shine through with the right approach to managing procrastination.

You are not alone in this wonderfully chaotic adventure.
 
If you live in PA, NJ or NY and want to start therapy, reach out here to schedule a free 15 minute intro call and see if we make a good fit!

Follow along on instagram @notbrokentherapy from a therapist who gets it.





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